Recent Comments

  • 7 years 4 weeks ago by: emily in reply to: Two Views of School Lunches: Jamie Oliver's and Mine

    bummer that the show is sponsored by hellmans "light" mayo though.

  • 7 years 4 weeks ago by: Kristin B in reply to: Two Views of School Lunches: Jamie Oliver's and Mine

    Emily, I serve my kids whole milk and whole milk yogurt at home, so I take your point about good/bad fats. The lunch's fat seemed mainly from the beans and cheese, so better fats than oils. Discouragingly, the white milk was 2%, and the flavored milks were skim, so rather than good fats, they have coloring, flavorings and sugar.

    Beth, the lunch he served in the preview didn't have the yogurt, and I'll be surprised if we see that. Like Emily wrote, healthy whole-fat foods like yogurt in moderation are better than lowered ones with additivies (like the salad dressings that came with my lunch salad)

  • 7 years 4 weeks ago by: Beth in reply to: Event Recap: Sen Yai Sen Lek Offers Local Food - Thai Style

    Rashmi, I can't speak about most of your list, but I know that I've seen chives and bitter gourd at the St. Paul Farmers Market every summer...

  • 7 years 4 weeks ago by: Beth in reply to: Two Views of School Lunches: Jamie Oliver's and Mine

    I haven't watched this show yet, but in some of the ads on TV, it seems as though part of the Jamie-created lunches is a Light & Fit yogurt. Now, part of me thinks that's great--yogurt should be a part of kids' diets--but Light & Fit is sweetened with aspartame, and full of other chemicals, and even for morbidly obese kids, there's got to be a better alternative than that. Again, haven't seen the show yet, so I may be taking the clip out of context, but I really hope that the school lunch revolution is toward whole, fresh foods, and away from more things made in factories.

  • 7 years 4 weeks ago by: Kristin B in reply to: How to Eat Simple, Good, Gluten-Free, and Tasty

    Tricia, as in Ayurveda, a thorough medical practitioner would likely advocate a whole body approach, starting by eliminating gluten, but also advising for appropriate exercise and a balanced diet that doesn't rely overmuch on processed, sugary, salty foods.

    I went gluten free on the advice of a holistic chiropractor when I was having breathing troubles, when medical docs found no lung problems or allergies. My breathing trouble cleared up, though was later identified as a symptom of anxiety, likely made worse by an imbalanced diet too heavy in wheat. While I saw the chiro, he advised cutting out wheat, supplements, other diet adjustments and regular chiro treatments. I gradually replaced his suggestions with yoga classes and other measures to increase balance and reduce anxiety.

    I agree that simply substituting a gluten-free diet may not address overall health, especially if the new diet includes many processed g-f foods.

  • 7 years 4 weeks ago by: emily in reply to: Two Views of School Lunches: Jamie Oliver's and Mine

    kids need good fat, so just because something isnt overly fatty doesnt make it better then a food that does have fats. there is a recent well known swedish study that found children who consumed low fat milk were more likely to become obese then children who consumed whole milk products. similar results have been found in men and women. also a recent meta-analysis found NO connection in numeroua studies between saturated fat intake and heart disease heart attacks etc.

    the grapes might have been fresh but grapes and bananas and watermelon have the most sugar content out of all fruits. better, lower sugar choices would be berries of all kinds or even applesauce would have less sugar then the same amount of grapes. yes, fruit has vitamins but veggies generally have more. for example kale has more vit c then an orange!

    the foods at our schools are made to seem healthy but i really believe they are not.

    your right to be worried about the flavored milks. they arent even food in my opinion.

  • 7 years 4 weeks ago by: Jessica in reply to: Event Recap: Sen Yai Sen Lek Offers Local Food - Thai Style

    Thanks for yet another great dinner! We were lucky enough to sit with Josh and Rama and had a great conversation about raising vegetables and meat, CSAs, and just life in general.

  • 7 years 4 weeks ago by: lee in reply to: Event Recap: Sen Yai Sen Lek Offers Local Food - Thai Style

    Great comment and post, Rashmi! Thanks for sharing some of your own needs - your momos are definitely on my list of favorite high quality, locally raised ethnic foods.

  • 7 years 4 weeks ago by: Rashmi in reply to: Event Recap: Sen Yai Sen Lek Offers Local Food - Thai Style

    Thanks for this wonderful update Lee. I'm bummed that I missed it. Great to hear that Joe is setting a good example to Ethnic Restaurant owners by focusing on quality.

    I also agree with him that the ethnic restaurants would benefit a lot if Local Farmers grew more variety of Asian Vegetables. To name a few:

    1. Taro (Amazingly, every part of this plant is edible! from the leaves, to the stems to the Root)

    2. Buckwheat (I was surprised to find out that many American farmers did not know Buckwheat leaves are edible. They usually grow buckwheat to lessen the weeds, they told me)

    3. Fenugreek (This has a very subtle bitter taste and is seasonal. Only Indian grocery stores sell them and they are imported, I really wish this healthy vegetable would be grown by MN farmers)

    4. Bitter Gourd (yet another vegetable that Nepalis and Indians believe is helpful for controlling high Blood Pressure)

    5. Bottle Gourd (This vegetable is usually mixed with potatoes and many of us eat the raw juice that helps in Digestion)

    6. Cluster Beans (these are very long and dark green and only found in Indian grocery stores)

    7. Jackfruit (this I believe grows in abundance in trees and I don't know if MN weather is favorable to grow the trees. It makes delicious curry and is subsidized for meats as vegetarians love it)

    8. Okra

    9. Snake Gourd

    10. Chives

    I hope the Farmers read this and it would be lovely to buy all these Veggies local instead of relying on Imported ones from Mexico or India. :)
    Thank you
    -Rashmi

  • 7 years 4 weeks ago by: new york real estate in reply to: The Farms of New York City

    Interesting article. I never knew that there were farms in New York.