Recent Comments

  • 6 weeks 2 days ago by: Jesse Haas in reply to: Wellness: Breaking the Addiction Cycle of Sugar

    Cold turkey is my best technique, too. It's hard, for sure, but so worth it. I find the longer I go without sugar, the less delicious it is when I have it again. Too sweet! I'm sorry you don't have the same experience, Anonymous; it makes obstaining all the more easy.

     

    Elizabeth and Connie, what are you motivations for going sugar free?

  • 6 weeks 2 days ago by: Anonymous in reply to: Wellness: Breaking the Addiction Cycle of Sugar

    As someone who had to give up all sugary treats after having an angioplasty 18 months ago, I can tell you I will never loose my taste for it, no matter hwo long I stay away. When I now eat the occasional cookie or baked good, it tastes better than ever and so I subsequently miss it even more. Going cold turkey is the only answer for me, the gradual approach simply will not work.

    http://nosaltnofatnosugar.com/2014/02/10/sugar-and-heart-disease-is-suga...

  • 6 weeks 2 days ago by: Jamie in reply to: Hunting for Dinner: Consider the Beaver

    Shari,

    I agree with Jessica that you are making assumptions, only I feel the assumption you have made is that trappers can not be ethical. All of the problems you stated are of course possibilities, however as an ethical trapper the young man I got the beaver from has spent countless hours scouting areas for trapping and learning how to set traps in areas that all but eliminate those issues. As far as the type of trap used he uses Dukes 330's which have been deemed humane by the US Fish and Wildlife service and are capable of dispatching an animal instantly and his traps are checked daily. Leg traps and snares are still used today but many states have banned them and most trappers have moved on from them to use other types of traps that are more effective.

    I have spent a good portion of my life hunting and work very hard at being good at what I do. If you have read any of my other post for the series Hunting for Dinner you would see that they all have one thing in common and that is that something had to die in order for me to make the featured dish. This is a responsibility that I do not take lightly, see my post about practice, http://youhavetocookitright.blogspot.com/2013/09/the-most-important-ingr....

    I assure you that if I am involved in something like this all efforts for a quick death were made. Killing is a necessary part of what I do and I do my very best to honor each animal that I kill by using all usable part of the animal and ensuring none goes to waste. If you have any question about hunting or what I do I would be happy to talk with you any time you would like and if you ever wanted to go hunting I would be happy to take you.

    Jamie

     

  • 6 weeks 2 days ago by: Shari D. in reply to: Hunting for Dinner: Consider the Beaver

    Hi, Jessica. Thanks for your reply. I agree it would be good to know what kind of trap was used, how often it was checked, and how the beaver was killed. I hope Jamie will let us know.

    As for your comment comparing this to feedlot cows, you are presenting a false dilemma. I agree that feedlot cows suffer greatly and needlessly. But this does not justify a lesser cruelty elsewhere. ("The cow suffered for its entire life; the beaver only suffered the last 12 hours of its.") 

  • 6 weeks 2 days ago by: Elizabeth in reply to: Wellness: Breaking the Addiction Cycle of Sugar

    I agree, especially in the first few days! I already feel some withdrawal symptoms so it's good to know I'm not alone in my skip-the-sugar journey. :)

  • 6 weeks 2 days ago by: Jessica in reply to: Hunting for Dinner: Consider the Beaver

    Hi Shari, I understand your concern as well. However, I think you are making assumptions here. We don't know the method of trapping utilized. It appears you assumed leg traps were used. There are whole traps which do not physically damage the animal - only keeping them in a cage for the short amount of time until the trapper checks the trap. I think they check traps daily. Now, I don't know what method was used here. But, would you agree that this is more humane than a feedlot cow? Wild animals live in their natural environment, eat normal diets, and move around as they would do normally. I'll take that over factory farm animals any day.

  • 6 weeks 2 days ago by: Connie in reply to: Wellness: Breaking the Addiction Cycle of Sugar

    Awesome to feel this support and camaraderie on what would otherwise be a plodding drudge of a journey! :-)

     

  • 6 weeks 2 days ago by: Elizabeth in reply to: Wellness: Breaking the Addiction Cycle of Sugar

    Connie, I'm right there with you! My first day too of trying to get the sugar monkey off my back...that's gotten to be a pretty big animal over the past couple months, but we can totally do this! Thanks, Jesse!

  • 6 weeks 2 days ago by: Jesse Haas in reply to: Wellness: Breaking the Addiction Cycle of Sugar

    Fight the good fight, Connie! You can do it.

  • 6 weeks 2 days ago by: Connie in reply to: Wellness: Breaking the Addiction Cycle of Sugar

    This is PERFECTLY-timed, Jesse, since today is my first day away from chocolate and candy. Thanks!!!